Register
Professional Misconduct

Christina Han-Yuen Tan


Address: WA, Australia
Sex: Female
Occupation: Pharmacist
Date: 25 June 2012


Details



The State Administrative Tribunal convicted Christina Han-Yuen Tan of impropriety in a professional respect. 

Tan was first registered as a pharmaceutical chemist with the Pharmaceutical Council of Western Australia on 3 December 2003 and was registered as a pharmaceutical chemist in the State of Western Australia under the provisions of the Act. 

From on or about 5 January 2004 Tan has been a member of various private health funds, and has variously held simultaneous membership of various private health funds.

From 2004 to 2010, Tan lodged or caused to be lodged claims in her own name and obtained benefits for services and pharmaceutical items from private health funds to which she was not legitimately entitled. The particulars of those claims are:
(i) receipts for 37 prescription medicines generated over the period 18 May 2007 to 5 March 2009 and subsequently submitted to HBF Health Limited (HBF), which paid benefits totalling $983.75 against 24 of the items
(ii) receipt for one medical device generated on 10 November 2007 and subsequently submitted to HBF, which paid a benefit of $75.00 against the item
(iii) receipts for 20 prescription medicines generated over the period 10 September 2004 to 29 January 2007 and subsequently submitted to Health Insurance Fund of Australia (HIF), which paid benefits totalling $978.65 against these items
(iv) receipts for 57 prescription medicines generated over the period 27 March 2004 to 7 April 2010 and subsequently submitted to SGIO Health Insurance (SGIO), which paid benefits totalling $1,867.75 against 44 of these items
(v) receipts for 6 medical devices generated over the period 31 July 2006 to 21 April 2010 and subsequently submitted to SGIO, which paid benefits totalling $998.90 against these items
 
Receipts for 24 prescription medicines were submitted to both SGIO and to HBF and receipts for 14 prescription medicines were submitted to both SGIO and to HIF.

From 2004 to 2009, Tan lodged or caused to be lodged claims in the name of Tsun Kit Tsang and obtained or caused to be obtained benefits for services and pharmaceutical items from private health funds to which neither she nor anyone else was legitimately entitled.  The particulars of those claims are:
(i) receipts for 32 prescription medicines generated over the period 4 June 2004 to 23 February 2009 and subsequently submitted to HBF, which paid benefits totalling $1,369.65 against 31 of these items.

From 2007 to 2009, Tan lodged or caused to be lodged claims in the name of Kim Seng Tan and obtained or caused to be obtained benefits for services and pharmaceutical items from private health funds to which neither she nor anyone else was legitimately entitled.  The particulars of those claims are:
(i) receipts for 30 prescription medicines generated over the period 9 March 2007 to 6 December 2009 and subsequently submitted to Medibank Private Ltd (Medibank), which paid benefits totalling $783.60 against 27 of these items.

From 2007 to 2009, Tan lodged or caused to be lodged claims in the name of Gim-Gaik Tan and obtained or caused to be obtained benefits for services and pharmaceutical items from private health funds to which neither she nor anyone else was legitimately entitled.  The particulars of those claims are:
(i) receipts for 25 prescription medicines generated over the period 31 October 2007 to 2 December 2009 and subsequently submitted to Medibank, which paid benefits totalling $747.95 against these items.

From 2007 to 2009, Tan lodged or caused to be lodged claims in the name of Han-Yee Tan and obtained or caused to be obtained benefits for services and pharmaceutical items from private health funds to which neither she nor anyone else was legitimately entitled.

Receipts for 26 prescription medicines generated over the period 8 November 2007 to 2 December 2009 and subsequently submitted to Medibank, which paid benefits totalling $680.15 against 21 of these items.

In connection with Tan making the insurance claims, she:
(i) issued or caused to be issued receipts for pharmacy items, being prescription medicines and medical devices, in her name and in the names of the other people in circumstances where those items had not been supplied to, or paid for by, the other people
(ii) processed transactions through the dispensary computer systems at various pharmacies at which she was employed for the purpose of generating receipts for prescription medicines while not holding valid prescriptions authorising the transactions, and subsequently deleted those transactions from the patient histories held in the dispensary computer systems at those pharmacies
(iii) altered the pharmacist identifier in the dispensary computer system in respect of receipts for prescription medicines issued in her name and in the names of the other people for the purpose of removing from the receipts reference to herself as the 'dispensing' pharmacist, and subsequently caused those receipts to be signed by a person other than the pharmacist whose name appeared on the receipts
(iv) processed transactions for medical devices through the point-of-sale (POS) system at various pharmacies at which she was employed for the purpose of generating receipts, and subsequently processed reversals of those transactions through the POS system
(v) having issued receipts in the circumstances described in the preceding sub-paragraphs, lodged or caused to be lodged private health fund claims in her own name, and in the name of other people, and obtained or caused to be obtained benefits for services and pharmaceutical items from private health funds to which neither she nor anyone else was legitimately entitled
(vi) submitted and or relied upon fraudulent documents to claim or caused to be claimed benefits for services and pharmaceutical items from the private health funds
(vii) undertook all of the conduct whilst registered as a pharmaceutical chemist.

Tan was suspended for 18 months and was ordered to pay $5,000 in costs.